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Graduate Researchers

Haleakala Angus

Master’s Student, Criminology & Criminal Justice Policy, University of Guelph

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Haleakala Angus is a Master of Arts student in the Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy program at the University of Guelph. She also completed her undergraduate degree at the University of Guelph in Criminal Justice and Public Policy. Haleakala is currently working on a major research paper for her Master’s degree which looks at race and the criminal justice system. Specifically, she is interested in examining how drug legislation has disproportionately affected minority populations. Throughout her studies, Haleakala has also become extremely interested in the issue of violence against women and is currently volunteering for the UNSA Femicide Watch Platform.


Danielle Bader

PhD Candidate, Sociology, University of Guelph

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Danielle Bader is a PhD student in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at the University of Guelph. She completed her B.A. in Criminology at York University and her M.A. at the University of Guelph in Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy. Danielle’s Master’s thesis was part of a larger community engaged evaluation research study of a sexual assault and domestic violence protocol implemented in Guelph-Wellington to improve the local response to violence against women from the perspective of service users. Her dissertation research employs a qualitative research design to understand the occurrence of intimate partner violence in non-urban communities in Ontario, specifically focusing on women’s fear and the corresponding strategies they employ to increase safety as well as barriers and challenges experienced by service providers responding to individuals and families affected by intimate partner violence in non-urban communities. Danielle is also a Statistical Assistant at the Guelph Branch Research Data Centre and has an interest in quantitative research methods. Danielle’s PhD research is being supervised by Dr. Myrna Dawson.


Ciara Boyd

PhD Student, Sociology, University of Guelph

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Ciara Boyd is currently a PhD student in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at the University of Guelph. Ciara completed her Honors B.A. from Western University with a specialization in Criminology and her M.A. in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy at the University of Guelph. Her research focuses on exploring and understanding different types of gender-based homicides, with a concentration on mass killings and familicides. With Myrna Dawson as her supervisor, Ciara’s M.A. thesis used a gendered theoretical framework to compare the characteristics of domestic and non-domestic mass killings in Ontario, a project she is expanding nationally in her PhD research. Ciara currently volunteers for the Femicide Watch Platform, a project coordinated by the United Nations Studies Association. Through this volunteer work, Ciara participates in various tasks that aim to evolve the understanding of femicide/feminicide, present key information, and address policy and decision-making at multiple levels. She is also volunteering for the Western Cold Case Society in London, Ontario, where she works collaboratively with students and faculty to analyze unsolved crimes that have occurred in both Canada and the U.S. Ciara works on various CSSLRV-research projects, including a SSHRC-funded project “Representing intimate femicide in Canada: Understanding media framing of gender-related killings of women and girls, 2010-2024.”


Abigail Mitchell

Master’s Student, Criminology & Criminal Justice Policy, University of Guelph

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Abigail Mitchell is an MA student in Criminology & Criminal Justice Policy at the University of Guelph. Prior to coming to the University of Guelph, Abigail completed a BSc in Forensic Science from Laurentian University and a Graduate Certificate in Clinical Research from Seneca College. Abigail’s Master’s thesis examines investigative decision-making in cases of sexual femicide. Her other research interests include gendered violence, LGBTQ+ victimization, and prostitution. Abigail currently spends her time volunteering with the United Nations Studies Association (UNSA) Femicide Watch Platform, reading, and playing boardgames.


Ana Nizharadze

JD Candidate, University of Ottawa

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Ana Nizharadze is a JD Candidate in the University of Ottawa Common Law program. Previously, she obtained her MA from University of Guelph, specializing in Political Science. Her MRP assessed application of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms under s. 32(1). She also completed her undergraduate degree at the University of Guelph, received a double major in Criminal Justice, Public Policy (CJPP) and Political Science. Ana’s research interests focus generally on law and politics. Recently, she has expanded her research to understand how surrogacy regulation impacts surrogate mothers and commissioning parents. Ana is also very interested in analyzing trends of homicide across Canada and finding ways to prevent femicide and domestic violence. She has worked with Professor Dawson on numerous research projects, both as an undergraduate and graduate student.


Andie Rexdiemer

Master’s Student, Criminology & Criminal Justice Policy, University of Guelph

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Andie Rexdiemer is an MA student in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy at the University of Guelph. She graduated with distinction with a B.A.(Honours) from Queen’s University in Global Development Studies. Under the supervision of Dr. Myrna Dawson and Dr. Ryan Broll, her research focuses on how digital media platforms facilitate ‘femicide’ within both intimate and non-intimate relationships, and the roles of social media corporations and law enforcement officials when policing ‘cyber-misogyny.’ Andie is currently volunteering with Femicide Watch Platform, United Nations Studies Association, to help update the content focused on education and awareness.


Emmanuel Rohn

PhD Student, Sociology, University of Guelph

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Emmanuel Rohn is a PhD student in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Guelph. He received his Bachelor of Arts Degree in sociology and social work from Kwame Nkrumah University of Science & Technology in Ghana. His undergraduate degree provided him with a distinctive perspective and way of seeing the social world and he became interested in research and a career in academia. After completing his bachelor’s degree, Emmanuel undertook a Master of Philosophy Degree in Sociology from the same University. With a research focus shift, he pursued another master’s degree in Sociology at the Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada. Specifically, his research focused on motivations and barriers to help-seeking behaviour among female survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV) in Ghana related to the demography of sub-Saharan Africa. Since then, Emmanuel has developed keen interest in issues bordering on intimate partner violence, intimate partner femicide, social justice, women’s empowerment, social and institutional responses to violence. Under the supervision of Professor Myrna Dawson, Emmanuel’s PhD research will help shift research attention to intimate partner femicide in sub-Saharan African particularly Ghana and assist in eradicating this form of violence.


Angelika Zecha

Master of Public Health Student, University of Waterloo

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Angelika Zecha is currently a Master of Public Health student at the University of Waterloo. She studies topics relating to epidemiology, biostatistics, and risk communication, and their applications to gun violence and homicide prevention. Prior to this, Angelika completed her Honours B.A. and her M.A. in the Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy program at the University of Guelph. Angelika’s research work was funded by an Ontario Graduate Scholarship and examined the role of firearms in Canadian homicides, with a focus on the contexts of rural intimate partner homicides. More specifically, she examined the effects of gender, victim-offender relationship, and geography on gun-related homicide victimization in Canada. Angelika volunteers for the UNSA’s Femicide Watch Team and works on the Global Femicide Watch Platform to increase education and awareness about the gender-related killings of women and girls. At the Centre for the Study of Social and Legal Responses to Violence, Angelika is working with Dr. Myrna Dawson on various research projects relating to femicide and domestic homicide, including the Canadian Domestic Homicide Prevention Initiative with Vulnerable Populations, a five-year SSHRC-funded research project.

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